© Mauro Baudino Collection - All rights reserved.

Studies

Handwriting study: learning to read Paul Mauser's scribbles - G. van Vlimmeren

Studying      old      German      handwriting      is      a      bit      of      a      challenge.      Several      styles      existed      of      which      the      Sütterlin      style      is      one      of     the      worst      to      get      to      know.      Paul   Mauser      was      born      and      educated      well      before      Sütterlin      was      introduced,      which      was      a     bit      of      an      advantage.      His      handwriting      is      a         variation         of         the         Kurrent      style,   a   handwriting   style   used   for   many   centuries in   Germany.   The         first         samples         of         Paul         Mauser's         handwriting         I         worked         with         were         found         on         the         back         of         a        letter         from         Georg         Luger         to         Paul         Mauser,         dating         from         the      early         1890s.         Paul         had         scribbled         his         notes         using         a        blunt         blue         pencil,         which         didn't         improve         things.         The         technique         I         employed         was         to         work         from         a         digital      copy        of         the         letter.         This         helped         to         preserve         the         original         and         it         enabled         me         to         zoom         in         and         out,         using         a         digital        imaging         program.         This         in         turn         helped         to      zero         in         on         individual         letters.         Key         to         identifying         letters         is         the        isolation         of         commonly         used         (short)         German         words         like         'die',         'das',         'und',         etc..         Once         the         first      words         were        identified,         the         characters         were         digitally         copied         to         a         chart         and         this         way         Paul         Mauser's         version         of         the        alphabet         was         slowly         completed.         This      chart   with   mappings   of   different   characters   in   both   upper-   and   lowercase variations   was   then   used   as      a   basis   for   further   translation   efforts.      Interestingly,         the         writing         style         differed         quite         a         bit        when         Paul         switched         from         pencil         to         pen         (ink)         and         back         again.      Also         we         see         some         changes         in         his         style     during         several         stages         of         his         life.         Paul         had         a         serious         eye-         and         hand         injury         in         1901         as         the         result         of         a        testing         accident         with         one         of         his         repeating         rifle      prototypes.         This         accident         (he         lost         one         eye         and         damaged         the        other,         as         well         as         almost         losing         his         index         finger)         had         a         lasting         effect         on         the         quality         of         his      handwriting.      A        second         chart         with         mappings         of         characters         written         with         a         pen         was         made         as         an         aid         for         translating         material        written         with         pen         and         ink.         The         most      challenging         problem         lies         in         the         limitations         of         the         reader         (in         this         case        myself),         the         reader         has         been         taught         his         own         writing         style         and         he         automatically      'translates'         handwriting         to        the         style         embedded         in         his         mind.         We         know         what         an         'a'         looks         like,         and         an         's',         for         example.         Now,         if         we        look         at         the         Mauser         files,      we         see         that         the         's'         and         the         'h'         are         written         in         a         similar         way,         which         resembles         an        'f'.   The   'e'   is   hardly   recognizable   as   such,   and   the   'a'   looks   like  something went horribly wrong with it. The      'o'      exists      in      a      very      squashed      form,      resembling      an      undotted      'i'      more      than      anything      else.      This      means      that      you     need      to      get      accustomed      to      this   shifting      of      familiar      shapes      and      you      constantly      have      to      ban      your      knowledge      of      your     own      handwriting      from      your      mind      when      trying      to      read      parts.         Like      switching   from   one   language   to   another,   this   takes   a little time, but it gets easier with practice.  Some examples: The      shape      of      the      letter      's'      changes      depending      on      the      location      of      the      letter      in      the      word,      and      the      sound      it      is   meant to represent. When the words start becoming recognizable the next problem arrives: Interpretation and translation.

Interpretation and translation

Paul Mauser ARCHIVE
Handwritten "h". All Rights Reserved. Handwritten "f". All Rights Reserved. Handwritten "r". All Rights Reserved. Gerben Letter Translation Table. All Rights Reserved. Different ways to write the "s" letter. All Rights Reserved.
© Mauro Baudino  - All rights reserved.

Studies

Handwriting study: learning to read

Paul Mauser's scribbles - G. van

Vlimmeren

Studying      old      German      handwriting      is      a      bit      of      a     challenge.      Several      styles      existed      of      which      the     Sütterlin      style      is      one      of      the      worst      to      get      to     know.      Paul   Mauser      was      born      and      educated     well      before      Sütterlin      was      introduced,      which     was      a      bit      of      an      advantage.      His      handwriting      is     a            variation            of            the            Kurrent        style,    a handwriting    style    used    for    many    centuries    in Germany.    The            first            samples            of            Paul          Mauser's         handwriting         I         worked         with         were        found         on         the         back         of         a         letter         from         Georg        Luger         to         Paul         Mauser,         dating         from         the     early         1890s.         Paul         had         scribbled         his         notes        using         a         blunt         blue         pencil,         which         didn't        improve         things.         The         technique         I         employed        was         to         work         from         a         digital      copy         of         the        letter.         This         helped         to         preserve         the         original        and         it         enabled         me         to         zoom         in         and         out,        using         a         digital         imaging         program.         This         in        turn         helped         to      zero         in         on         individual         letters.        Key         to         identifying         letters         is         the         isolation         of        commonly         used         (short)         German         words         like        'die',         'das',         'und',         etc..         Once         the         first      words        were         identified,         the         characters         were         digitally        copied         to         a         chart         and         this         way         Paul        Mauser's         version         of         the         alphabet         was        slowly         completed.         This      chart   with   mappings   of different   characters   in   both   upper-   and   lowercase variations   was   then   used   as      a   basis   for   further translation   efforts.      Interestingly,         the         writing        style         differed         quite         a         bit         when         Paul        switched         from         pencil         to         pen         (ink)         and        back         again.      Also         we         see         some         changes         in        his         style      during         several         stages         of         his         life.        Paul         had         a         serious         eye-         and         hand         injury        in         1901         as         the         result         of         a         testing         accident        with         one         of         his         repeating         rifle      prototypes.        This         accident         (he         lost         one         eye         and        damaged         the         other,         as         well         as         almost        losing         his         index         finger)         had         a         lasting         effect        on         the         quality         of         his      handwriting.      A         second        chart         with         mappings         of         characters         written        with         a         pen         was         made         as         an         aid         for        translating         material         written         with         pen         and        ink.         The         most      challenging         problem         lies         in        the         limitations         of         the         reader         (in         this         case        myself),         the         reader         has         been         taught         his        own         writing         style         and         he         automatically     'translates'            handwriting            to            the            style          embedded         in         his         mind.         We         know         what         an        'a'         looks         like,         and         an         's',         for         example.        Now,         if         we         look         at         the         Mauser         files,      we        see         that         the         's'         and         the         'h'         are         written         in        a         similar         way,         which         resembles         an         'f'.         The        'e'         is         hardly         recognizable         as         such,         and         the        'a'         looks         like      something   went   horribly   wrong with it. The        'o'        exists        in        a        very        squashed        form,      resembling      an      undotted      'i'      more      than      anything     else.        This        means        that        you        need        to        get      accustomed      to      this   shifting      of      familiar      shapes     and        you        constantly        have        to        ban        your      knowledge      of      your      own      handwriting      from      your     mind        when        trying        to        read        parts.            Like      switching    from    one    language    to    another,    this takes a little time, but it gets easier with practice.  Some examples: The      shape      of      the      letter      's'      changes      depending     on      the      location      of      the      letter      in      the      word,      and     the  sound  it  is meant to represent. When   the   words   start   becoming   recognizable   the next       problem       arrives:       Interpretation       and translation.

Interpretation and translation

Archive Digitalization

The    Archive    digitalization    is    the    first    step    for    a serious   analysis   of   the   Paul   Mauser   documents. All   the   documents   are   sorted   by   year   and   then   by type   (diary,   letters,   notes,   telegrams...).   For      each     year      a      folder      is      defined.      Inside      it,      several     folders        are        associated        for        each        type        of      document.            Each      folder            contains            the        scan/picture      of      the      document      with      the      related     translation.      After      this      classification,      the   analysis and   interpretation   of   the   documents   start.   All      the     undated      document      are      stored      in      the      same     folder.      For      some         of         them         a         tentative         of        dating         could         be      done         based         on         the        content.         If         the         content         interpretation         is        accepted         then         the         document         is         moved         in        the  related year folder.
Paul Mauser ARCHIVE